LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES Course Description

ART101 Art History I (3 credits)

This course surveys the development of Art from the prehistory to 1400. The focus of study is a historical chronology looking at the development of aesthetic and the artistic styles in the cultures of Western and eastern civilization. Students will be exposed to ideas and theories about socio-cultural motivations behind the artistic and architectural works in the eras studied. Areas of study will include: known beginnings of art; art in historical contexts; the art of the ancient Near East; the art of the ancient Egypt; the art of the Aegean; the art of the Etruscans; the art of ancient Greece; the art of ancient Rome; the art of Byzantium; Romanesque art; the art of late antiquity; early medieval art in the West; and Gothic art.

ART102 Art History II (3 credits)

This course surveys the development of Art from 1400 to current day. The focus of study is a historical chronology looking at the development of aesthetic and the artistic styles in the cultures of Western and Eastern civilization. Students will be exposed to ideas and theories about socio-cultural motivations behind the artistic and architectural works in the eras studied. Areas of study will include; early and high renaissance art in Italy, Baroque and Rococo, Romanticism Neo Classicism, Modernism, photography, Impressionism, and contemporary art movements of the current day.

BMS105 Physical Fitness (3 credits) Fall

Physical fitness education can lead to positive lifestyle changes resulting in a better quality of life for a lifetime. Proper physical fitness can improve academic performance, reduce stress, prevent unnecessary injuries and aid in the avoidance of common illnesses.  In this course, students will learn the basics of physical fitness and proper nutrition. They will be taught how to develop an exercise and dietary program for the maintenance of proper aerobic endurance, strength, agility, and flexibility for a lifetime of good health.

BMS132 Nutrition, Health and Wellness (3 credits) Fall

Understanding nutrition is essential for lifelong health and wellness. This course will describe the anatomy and physiology of nutrient digestion, absorption, and utilization throughout all stages of human life.  The various classes of nutrients, essential vitamins and minerals and their role in metabolism will be explored. This course will focus on teaching behavioral change and personal decision making so that students will be able to monitor, understand, and affect their own nutritional behaviors. Required for Biomedical Science student

BMS135 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)

This course will provide a broad introduction to the field of psychology. Topics to be covered include: key figures in psychology, major psychological theories, examples of major research findings, data collection on the causes and correlates of behavior, and the use of psychological knowledge to improve the quality of our lives. This survey of psychology will acquaint the student with the major concepts and terminology of the discipline and provide a better understanding of self and others. Required for Biomedical Science student

BSC100 Principles of Biology (3 credits) Spring

This course is an introduction to the basic biological sciences that will form a foundation for more advanced biological science classes. Topics include characteristics of life, scientific method, basic cell chemistry and biochemistry, cellular and subcellular structure, transport across cell membranes, cell energy, photosynthesis, mitosis, meiosis, patterns of inheritance, DNA & RNA structure and replication, protein synthesis, genetic mutation, evolution, microorganisms, plants and fungi, human transporting systems, human maintenance systems, human digestive system and nutrition, and ecology.

BSC100L Principles of Biology Lab (1 credit) Spring

This course, in cooperation with the Principles of Biology lecture, is an introduction to the basic biological sciences that will form a foundation for more advanced biological science classes. This course will use hands-on and practical applications through controlled laboratory experimentation to examine and reinforce some of the major topics covered in the lecture.

CHM100 Principles of Chemistry (3 credits) Fall

This introductory course investigates the fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include scientific measurement, states of matter, solution chemistry, acid-base theory, oxidation-reduction reactions, chemical bonding, nomenclature, gases, heat of formation of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. 

CHM100L Principles of Chemistry Lab (1 credit) Fall

This course introduces laboratory exercises in physical and chemical properties of matter, with an introduction to both qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis. Topics include molecular structure, bonding, chemical reactions, acid-base chemistry, kinetics, and an introduction to spectrophotometric methods of analysis, and thermochemistry. The laboratory experiments coordinate with and reinforce the lecture materials of CHM100.

CIS101 Introduction to Computer Science (3 credits)

This introductory course provides the basics of computer science while helping students develop methodological thinking in problem-solving using computers. A large part of the course is built around the development of computer programs or parts of programs that correctly solve a given problem.

CLC105 Chinese Language and Culture Studies I (3 credits) Fall

The course will focus on basic grammar, vocabulary, and day-to-situations. Students will memorize and recite the Three Character Classic (三字經), while learning about the traditions and values underpinning Chinese culture.

CLC106 Chinese Language and Culture Studies II (3 credits) Spring

The course will continue to focus on basic grammar, vocabulary, and day-to-situations, while moving on to more abstract expression. Students will memorize and recite the Three Character Classic (三字經) and other simple classic Chinese literature pieces, while learning about the traditions and values underpinning Chinese culture. Prerequisite: CLC105

CLC205 Chinese Language and Culture Studies I (3 credits) Fall

The language part of this course focuses on developing reading and writing skills. Students will make progress increasing the size of their Chinese vocabulary via reading and writing assignments. The course trains students to think historically and comparatively about Chinese traditions, through weekly readings and writing homework. Class lectures will also make extensive use of primary source visual materials. The combination of these sources will help to bring the Chinese heritage to life while also grounding concepts in specific historical and literary contexts.

CLC206 Chinese Language and Culture Studies II (3 credits) Spring

In this course students will practice more on the Chinese handwriting in the traditional way, recite the Three Character Classic,《三字經》and other highly appreciated articles or poems, learn more about the traditional Chinese culture through ancient history study. The course will help students build connotation and traditional value to face this fast and modern society. Prerequisite: CLC205

CLC305 Chinese Language and Culture Studies I (3 credits) Fall

Through listening, speaking, reading, composing, class discussions, or oral presentations, the course is devoted to improve student’s language skills based on the level they are at and expose them to a wide range of topics in Chinese history, culture, literature, and arts. Part I of the course focuses on the overview of the Taoist and Buddhist ideology schools and their historical developments. The course trains students to think historically and comparatively about Chinese traditions, and includes weekly readings and analysis of primary source texts.

CLC306 Chinese Language and Culture Studies II (3 credits) Spring

This course is the continuation of CLC105. It continues to develop students’ proficiency in Mandarin Chinese in listening, speaking, reading, and writing and deepen their exposure to Chinese history, culture, literature, and arts. The part II of the course focuses on the Confucius ideology school and its historical development. The course then moves on exploring various aspects of Chinese traditional culture, with emphasis on those in the realms of literature and the arts. Prerequisite: CLC305

CLC131 Topics in Chinese History (3 credits) Spring

This course chronologically explores some of the major themes in Chinese history from its beginnings to the present. The objective is not to provide an overall survey as it would be impossible to do justice to over three millennia of recorded history within the span of a single semester. Rather, the course will highlight some of the most interesting, important, and controversial themes in Chinese history. In doing so, the course seeks to introduce students to the different political, social, economic, and cultural forces that shaped the emergence of China as an identifiable entity, and asks the question of what constitutes “Chinese” from a historical perspective. By emphasizing the processes through which Chinese civilization has been repeatedly reconfigured throughout its history, not in isolation, as is often believed, but through expansion and interaction with other groups outside its initial political and cultural borders, the objective of the course is to enable students to grasp the complexity of the forces that molded and formed this entity that today we call “China.”

DAN242 History of Dance: East and West (2 credits) Fall Spring

This course takes students through the historical development of dance and looks at the social, cultural, and artistic factors that produced what are now categorized as dance forms. The goals of the course are to study the history of dance, dancers, choreographers, and significant dance works as an art form in relation to other arts and in the greater context of historical time periods.

ECO101 Principles of Economics (3 credits)

This course provides an introduction to a broad range of concepts, theories, and analytical techniques of microeconomics. It focuses on the analysis of choices made by individual decision-making units (individuals, households, and firms). The use of a market, supply and demand, model will be the fundamental model in which trade-offs and choices will be considered through comparison of costs and benefits of actions. Production and market structure will be analyzed at the firm level. The role of government policy to address microeconomic market failures will be examined.Required for Data Science student

ENG101 English Composition I (3 credits) Fall

Effective English will explore writing and critical thinking and how to integrate analysis of text into effective essays. This course seeks to enable students to learn how to write across disciplines in a formal way. Students are taught how to present and support thesis statements and to use textual analysis to support their ideas. The class also addresses grammatical and research components of writing and how to use MLA.

ENG102 English Composition II (3 credits) Spring

This course is to enhance students’ ability to read and think critically, to research and evaluate evidence competently, and to write clearly. It focuses on helping students develop the skills needed to approach a body of material, to analyze it, and to explicate it. Students will write interpretive, evaluative, and analytical essays and an appropriately documented research paper, all of which contain properly constructed thesis statements. Prerequisite: CLC101, Required for student who major in science including Biomedical Science and Data Science

ENG104 Public Speaking (3 credits) Fall Spring

This course will explore effective ways to communicate through public speaking. Students will come to understand through practice and observation what makes for effective and ineffective public speaking. The course will examine and critique methods and practices through the primary text and documented examples.

ENG105 Effective Reading and Analysis (3 credits) Spring

This course develops reading and critical thinking skills, with an emphasis on logical reasoning, and literary analysis skills based primarily on western literature, including short stories, poems, and a novelette. Analytical evaluations are made of texts to reveal timeless themes of character, morality, the “human condition,” and social responsibility. Prerequisite: ENG101

ENG203 Introduction to British Literature (3 credits)

This course provides a sampling of the work of some of the major authors in British Literature. It requires works to be read and examined for an understanding of the material, an appreciation of the literary forms and for the awareness of unifying themes that hold together a culture’s conceptual framework. All readings will be considered in their literary and historical contexts so that the student will gain an understanding of the historical, cultural, and philosophical influences that shape the texts. The course enhances reading skills and aesthetic appreciation through exposure, discussion, writing, and critical thinking. Prerequisite: ENG101

ENG204 Survey of Western Literature (3 credits)

In this survey of Western Literature students will be introduced to some of the major literary voices, themes, genres, and movements of Western literature. Students will study representative authors and forms of creative expression critically recognized as influential in shaping the literary heritage of the Western world. This class seeks to lay a valuable foundation for understanding key historical, intellectual, and social developments, which have shaped Western world literature. Prerequisite: ENG101

ENG205 Writing for Media (3 credits) Spring

This course will explore various Mediums of Media and methods to approach writing for each one. This course covers the basics of news writing: news stories, feature stories, and opinion pieces. Students will practice writing for online as well as print publications and analyze scripts for film. Journalistic ethics and law will be discussed throughout the course as various issues arise. This course is writing-intensive and requires students to practice writing every day. Prerequisite: ENG101

HUM101 Western Civilization (3 credits) Fall

This course is a broad survey introduction to Western Civilization from the modern age to the present day. The course focuses on events and concepts that have shaped the West. Three main periods are examined including the rise of modernity, the period of revolution, and the destructive world wars and crises of the contemporary age.

HUM105 World Civilization (3 credits) Spring

This course introduces the student to the major civilizations of the world. The various civilizations of Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas are analyzed separately, emphasizing the unique contributions of each. Emphasis is also placed on cross-cultural contacts and connections to illustrate the diversity and unity of the human condition in the world society.

HUM125 U.S. Society and Government (3 credits) Fall Spring

This course is a survey of the U.S. political system at the national level including treatment of the historical background, central concepts and revisions of the constitutional framework, examination of the presidency, congress, federal bureaucracy, judicial structure and process, political parties, interest groups, the media, and current

public issues.

HUM130 Philosophical Perspectives I (1 credit) Fall

This course will provide students with a broad introduction to the field of philosophy and ethics, acquaint students with the terminology and major concepts of the disciplines and provide students with a deeper understanding of different philosophical and ethical viewpoints. The course aims to help students gain better understanding of  oneself, life, and the universe. The part I will cover different philosophies and schools of thought throughout history with a focus on Western Perspectives.

HUM131 Philosophical Perspectives II (1 credit) Spring

The part II will focus on different philosophies and schools of thought throughout history of China.

HUM231 Philosophical Perspectives III (1 credit) Fall

The part III will engage critical thinking, debate, and argumentation on a survey of philosophical topics in connection with today’s world. Prerequisite: HUM130 and HUM131

LAS003 College Success (0 credit) Fall

This course is designed to help students create greater success in college and in life. Students will learn many proven strategies for creating greater academic, professional, and personal success.

LAS005 Cultivation Practice (0 credit) Fall Spring

This course is designed to improve students’ mental, physical, and spiritual wellbeing through gentle exercises, meditation, and group study time based on principals of traditional self-cultivation practices.

LAS004 Career Development Seminar (0 credit) Fall

This course is a zero-credit, pass/fail course typically required in the undergraduate junior year. It is designed to provide students with the skills necessary for career readiness, job search and a basic understanding of what work-life is like in the real world.

LAS105 Art and Aesthetics (3 credits) Fall

This course takes a philosophical approach to the nature of beauty in the arts with an emphasis on dance and music. This course offers student an introduction to a variety of traditional, cross-cultural, and philosophical theories of art such as Platonic, Enlightenment, and ancient Chinese. We will focus our attention upon the arts in dance and music, but we will touch upon the visual and literary arts as well. Students will gain an appreciation of the difficulties philosophers have encountered in framing a theory of “aesthetic perception,” and learn to develop their own aesthetic perceptions based on philosophical judgments and a work’s objective attributes.

MAT101 Applied Math (3 credits)

This course provides comprehensive coverage of essential topics in mathematics including: trigonometry; discrete mathematics; analytic geometry; algebra and elementary functions; and an introduction to calculus. The lessons develop mathematics using numerous examples, real-world applications, and an engaging narrative. Graphs, diagrams, and illustrations are used throughout to help students visualize concepts. Directions clearly indicate which problems may require the use of a graphing calculator.

MAT104 Applied Calculus (3 credits)

This course is a one-semester introductory calculus course covering basic analytic geometry of graphs of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, integration and applications to the biomedical science and other disciplines. Prerequisite: three years of high school mathematics (including trigonometry and logarithms) or a pre-calculus course.

MUS242G History of Music (3 credits) Fall Spring

A browse of western music and its evolution from the middle-age period to the early romantic era, covering important composers and significant historic events during those time. Upon completion of this course the students will be able to gain perspectives in fundamental western music history through middle-age to 19th century (divided by three periods: the middle-age, the renaissance, and baroque up to classical and early romantic periods) and draw conclusion through informed historic facts and personal interpretations.

PHY101 General Physics I (3 credits) Fall

This is the first course of a two-semester sequence.  It starts with mechanics, which includes the study of linear, circular, and rotational motion, how to apply Newton’s laws and the concepts of energy and momentum.  It also covers thermodynamics including temperature, heat transfer, and changes in state and ends with the analysis of the sinusoidal nature of simple harmonic motion.

PHY101L General Physics I Lab (1 credit) Fall

A hands-on physics lab that covers the fundamental principles of physics including measurement, motion, work, and thermodynamics with emphasis on problem solving. Experiments have been selected to reinforce the material presented in Physics 101, which should be taken concurrently.

PHY102 General Physics II (3 credits) Spring

This is a continuation of General Physics I. The course will cover wave phenomena and sound; electricity and magnetism; optics; quantum theory; and nuclear physics. Many concepts from General Physics I will be used in this course such as: position, velocity, acceleration, force, Newton’s laws of motion, work, and energy. Prerequisite: PHY101

PHY102 General Physics II Lab (1 credit) Spring

A hands-on physics lab that covers the fundamental principles of physics including electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Experiments have been selected to reinforce the material presented in PHY102, which should be taken concurrently.