Biomedical Sciences COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

BMS101 Introduction to Biomedical Science (1 credit) Fall

This course provides an overview of topics in the biomedical sciences. This course introduces the student to various pathways and career opportunities in biomedical sciences. The course also discusses the necessary steps in preparing for and applying to medical school and other postgraduate careers in professions related to the biomedical sciences.

BMS102 Medical Terminology (2 credits) Spring

This course introduces students to the language of medicine. Students will gain an understanding of basic elements, rules of building and analyzing medical words, and medical terms associated with the body as a whole. Utilizing a systems-approach, the student will define, interpret, and pronounce medical terms relating to structure and function, pathology, diagnosis, clinical procedures, oncology, and pharmacology. In addition to medical terms, some of common abbreviations applicable to each system will be introduced.

BMS103 Biomedical Ethics (2 credits) Fall

The course will take a case-based approach to examining moral dilemmas you may encounter in research, medicine, and technology, and study ways of analyzing those dilemmas to make them more easily controlled. We will focus on examples in clinical medicine, research integrity, data, conflicts of interest, genetics, and others.

BMS141 Introduction to US Healthcare (3 credits) Fall

This course introduces the student to the dynamic and complex changes that have occurred in the US healthcare system. Each class session requires students to think critically and communicate in small as well as large group settings to discuss ways in which he or she can contribute to health-related industries.

BMS145 Healing Traditions Around the World (3 credits) Fall

This course will ‘journey’ to different cultures around the world, past and present, exploring their different concepts, methods and lifestyles for physical, emotional, and spiritual health and wellness.

 

BMS323 Introduction to Medical Laboratory Science (3 credits) Spring

An Introduction to Medical Laboratory Science includes: quality control; laboratory math; laboratory safety; care and use of basic laboratory equipment; as well as laboratory settings, accreditation, and certification. Upon successful completion of this course the student will: demonstrate laboratory safety; perform laboratory math; and describe quality control. The student will demonstrate the correct use of basic laboratory equipment and be able to explain accreditation and certification processes. Prerequisite: BSC212 and BSC212L

BMS231 Public Health and Epidemiology (3 credits) Spring

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of epidemiological methods and understand the determinants and distribution of public health related events. The course will cover the history of epidemiology, types of epidemiological studies and methodology, data analysis for epidemiological purposes, and policy implications of epidemiological findings. The class will engage the students in active and collaborative learning through case studies, group discussions or individual presentations, and various types of assignments. Prerequisite: STA101

BMS232 Introduction to Naturopathy I (3 credits) Fall

Naturopathic medicine is a distinct primary health care profession, emphasizing prevention, treatment, and optimal health through the use of therapeutic methods and substances that encourage individuals’ inherent self-healing ability.  The practice of naturopathy includes modern and traditional, scientific, and empirical methods. Naturopathic practitioners recognize that nature is inherently wise and that abiding by its laws reinforces and sustains individual health and well-being. The information in this course combines traditional herbal wisdom with recent evidence-based research. These traditions include Western herbalism, energetics, homeopathy as well as traditional Chinese and Ayurvedic botanical medicine.. Prerequisite: BMS132 and BSC212.

BMS233 Introduction to Naturopathy II (3 credits) Fall

The second part of this course will go beyond the traditions and the emphasis is on contemporary research in phytochemistry and pharmacognosy. Prerequisite: BMS232

BMS235 Life Span of Developmental Psychology (3 credits)

This is an introductory course that examines the development of individuals from conception to death. With each life stage, current and historical research and theoretical information will be presented related to socioemotional, physical, and cognitive development. Also covered will be the effect of cultural differences on human development, ethical issues related to development, and problems that occur during development.Prerequisite: BMS135

BMS241 Chinese Medicine Theories and Principles I (3 credits) Fall

Yin and yang, the five-phase theory, meridians, acupuncture, and the wisdom of medicinal and culinary herbs are the foundations of Chinese medicine. This course will explore all the elements that constitute the philosophy and practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM).

BMS242 Chinese Medicine Theories and Principles II (3 credits) Spring

Traditional Chinese Medicine II will expand further on the knowledge gained in the first course, specifically on TCM theory, meridian anatomy and energy flow, dysfunction in the human energetic system and the basics of acupuncture therapy. Prerequisite: BMS241

BMS301 Introduction of Pathology (3 credits)

Concepts of Altered Health States introduces the student to pathophysiology and disruptions in the normal body functioning in individuals across the lifespan. Objective and subjective manifestations of common health problems resulting from the environmental, genetic, and stress-related maladaptations are assessed and analyzed. Assessment findings, diagnostic testing, and interventions for specific health problems are discussed. Pharmacologic treatments for specific health problems are explored. Prerequisite: BSC212

BMS302 Introduction of Pharmacology (3 credits)

Pharmacology is the study of how medicines work in health and disease in Humans and animals.  Pharmacology is therefore the basis of therapeutics and of fundamental importance to medical sciences in Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry, and Optometry and other biomedical related disciplines including basic and clinical research.  This is an introductory course to lay the foundation for understanding basic concepts in Pharmacology and the pharmacological basis of therapeutics. Prerequisite: CHM212

BMS331 Introduction of Homeopathy (3 credits)

The course is designed for students to learn the fundamentals of treating disease naturally and effectively It provides a solid grounding in the philosophy and fundamental principles governing the practice of this great art, along with studies of some primary remedies. Prerequisite: BMS232

BMS332 Basics of Herbalism (3 credits)

This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of the history and uses of herbs including basic methods of administration and therapeutic actions of each of the botanicals studied. Prerequisite: BMS232

BMS333 Topics in Holistic Nutrition (3 credits)

Holistic nutrition is the foundation to any natural health lifestyle plan for optimal health. This course covers CAM (Complementary and Alternative Medicine) topics in nutrition, such as “nutritionism” and the Western diet, detoxification, fasting and elimination and juice therapies, acid-alkaline balance, raw foods, and a detailed look at food labeling. Prerequisite: BMS232

BMS341 Kinesiology and Physical Fitness and Lab (3 credits) Fall

Physical fitness is closely tied to optimal health and wellness. An understanding of the structure and function of the musculoskeletal system in motion allows the student to grasp the concepts of physical training and fitness in preparation for either a career in physical therapy, fitness, or sport related fields as well as for the maintenance of life long fitness habits for themselves and their families.  There will also be a laboratory practicum for this course. Prerequisite: BSC212

BMS346 Biomedical Sciences Literature (3 credits) Fall

This course focuses on developing the thinking skills associated with becoming critical consumers of research literature. Through these learning experiences, you will be able to identify key research concepts and utilize these research concepts to begin evaluating research articles more critically. These critical thinking competencies are directly applicable to your coursework and to each aspect of the research process that you will continue to encounter as you advance in your program of studies as well as your future biomedical career.. Prerequisite: BSC212 and BSC215

BMS351 Biomedical Science Internship (3 credits)

Internships provide entry-level, off-campus career-related experience. Internships may also be used as an opportunity to explore career fields. This course provides students with a supervised, practical learning experience in a work setting that is relevant to their program of study. Through course assignments and workplace tasks and projects the student will apply, connect, and extend in-class academic theory and skills for a professional development. Prerequisite: department approval

BMS451 Biomedical Science Practicum I (4 credits) Fall

This practicum is part of the Senior Capstone Experience and will allow students to work with a qualified mentor who is either a faculty member or an off-campus supervisor for an individual project to gain practical and research experience in the field of biomedical sciences. It allows students to have a taste and some hands-on experience of activities in a potential future career, such as biomedical laboratory experiments, public health programs, health data analytics, precision health and medical clinic observership. Prerequisite: BMS346 and 80 cr

BMS452 Biomedical Science Practicum II (4 credits) Spring

The practicum project is the culminating product of the B.S. in biomedical sciences program. Students will gain practical experience that requires them to assimilate everything learned in the program. Based on individual interests, each student will work with a qualified mentor under mutual agreements to complete an individual project during the last two semesters of  study to gain practical and research experience in biomedical sciences. Prerequisite: BMS346 and 80 cr

BSC101 General Biology I (3 credits) Fall

This is the first half of a one-year course designed for science majors. This course introduces the principles and concepts of contemporary biology, covering the chemical basis of biology, cell structure and function, genetics, and molecular biology. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels.

BSC101L General Biology I Lab (1 credit) Fall

This course, in cooperation with the General Biology I Lecture, is an introduction to the basic biological sciences that will form a foundation for more advanced biological science classes. This course will use hands-on and practical applications through controlled laboratory experimentation to examine and reinforce some of the major topics covered in the lecture..

BSC102 General Biology II (3 credits) Spring

This is the second half of a one-year course designed for biomedical science major. It covers main topics on Biotechnology, Evolution, Plants, Animals and Ecology. Different from Gen Bio I focusing on the cellular and molecular level, Gen Bio II focuses on the organism level and beyond. It provides a broad foundation of life/body system of all kinds of species. 3. Prerequisite: BSC101

BSC102L General Biology II Lab (1 credit) Spring

This course, in cooperation with the General Biology II Lecture, will use hands-on and practical applications through controlled laboratory experimentation to examine and reinforce some of the major topics covered in the lecture including the regulation of gene expression, biotechnology, evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology of plants and animals, etc. Prerequisite: BSC101L

BSC211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3 credits) Fall

This is the first of two courses that will describe the structure and function of the human body. Topics will include anatomical terminology, the organizational structure of the body and how it maintains homeostasis. This course will discuss the structure and function of the integumentary system, the musculoskeletal system, the endocrine system, and nervous system, including the sensory organs. Students will also perform and complete a practical laboratory component to this course. Prerequisite: BSC102

BSC211L Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab (1 credit) Fall

This laboratory course is designed to promote learning through the development of the laboratory skills of observation, demonstration, and experimentation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of anatomy and physiology. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, the cell, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Laboratory materials will include microscopic specimens, models, charts, illustrations, and sample analysis kits. Prerequisite: BSC102L

BSC212 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3 credits) Spring

This is the second of two courses that will describe the structure and function of the remainder of human body as well as how all elements of the body function together in an integrated fashion. This course will discuss the structure and function of the cardiovascular system, the lymphatic system, the gastrointestinal system, the respiratory system, as well as the urinary and reproductive systems. Students will also perform and complete a practical laboratory component to this course. Prerequisite: BSC211

BSC212L Human Anatomy and Physiology II lab (1 credit) Spring

This laboratory course is designed to promote learning through the development of the laboratory skills of observation, demonstration, and experimentation. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of anatomy and physiology. Topics covered include, but are not limited to: blood and blood testing, the cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Laboratory materials will include microscopic specimens, models, charts, illustrations, and sample analysis kits. Prerequisite: BSC211L

BSC213 Introduction to Microbiology and Lab (3 credits) Fall

Microorganisms in the context of this course includes bacteria, microscopic fungi (yeasts and molds), protozoan, microscopic algae, prions  and viruses, but our particular focus is on Bacteria. The major themes of our lectures are general principles for growth, metabolism, classification, description of microbiological life forms, uses of microorganisms, and microorganisms in disease. The course will also examine the interactions of microbes with each other, hosts, and the environment. Laboratory activities will reinforce principles of microbiology, including structure, function, genetics, and phylogeny of microbes.. Prerequisite: BSC102

BSC215 Cell and Molecular Biology (3 credits) Fall

This course is the advanced extension of General Biology. It will explore the molecular basis on the processes and mechanisms of the contral dogma, as well as the regulation of gene exression. Major cell structures and functions; such as cell signlaing, cell cycle, cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, etc. will also be discussed.. Emphasis will be placed on eukaryotes. Prerequisite: BSC102

BSC215L Cell and Molecular Biology Lab (1 credits) Fall

This lab course will introduce topics on a variety of biotechnologies used to study molecular and cellular biology. Couple of experiments will give students some hands-on experience on basics of biomedical research. Prerequisite: BSC102L

BSC221 Human Genetics and Genomics (3 credits) Spring

This course will reinforce the basic concepts and principles of the genetics and how they apply to human biology and diseases, including the classic and extension of Mendelian Genetics, linkage and mapping, sex linked inheritance, genetic mutations, and epigenetics.  The human genome sequence forms the cornerstone of contemporary human genetics. This course will discuss the field of genomics with a strong human disease perspective. How genome-based strategies are used for the detection, treatment, and prevention of human diseases. It will cover the architecture of human genome, genome variations, genome analysis, personal genomics, and cancer genomics. Prerequisite: BSC102

BSC321 Biochemistry (3 credits) Fall

This is an introductory biochemistry course, emphasizing broad understanding of chemical and biological events happening in living systems. The course covers the biochemistry topics including the structure and functional relationship of biological molecules, including proteins, enzymes, carbo-hydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. In addition, this course provides an introduction to metabolic pathways and bioenergetics, including glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, etc.. Prerequisite: CHM211

BSC331 Introduction to Neuroscience (3 credits) Spring

Neuroscience – The study of structures and functions of nervous system. The lecture topic may include:  The Structure of the Nervous System; Neurons and Glia; Neuronal Action Potential and Neuronal Membrane at Rest;  Synaptic Transmission; Neurotransmitter Systems; Neuroplasticity; Sensory System; Motor System; Memory System; Language Processing; The Brain and Human Behavior, and the clinical correlations of neuroscience etc. Prerequisite: BSC212

BSC332 Developmental Biology (3 credits)

This course introduces students to the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the early development of organisms. The focus will be on the genes and proteins involved in controlling the behavior of cells in the processes of differentiation, morphogenesis, and growth. Developmental mechanisms and processes will be examined in genetic model organisms such as the fruit fly and the worm as well as in vertebrates such as the frog, chicken, mouse, and humans. Prerequisite: BSC215

BSC333 Introduction to Bioinformatics (3 credits)

This course is designed to give students both a theoretical background and a working knowledge of the techniques employed in bioinformatics. Emphasis will be placed on biological sequence (DNA, RNA, protein) analysis and its applications. Prerequisite: BSC221

BSC335 Introduction to Immunology (3 credits) Fall

This course will explore the immune systems of vertebrates that enable them to recognize and respond specifically to foreign substances. The molecular and cellular basis of immunity will also be discussed. The roles of antigens, antibodies and immunocompetent cells in pathogenesis and immunity to infectious diseases will be covered. The applications of immunology in the design of vaccines, immunotherapeutics, immunodiagnostics, and organ transplantation will be briefly discussed, as will the uses of immunology in biological research.  Prerequisite: BSC212

CHM101 General Chemistry I (3 credits) Fall

This course is a general chemistry which is the foundation for all advanced chemistry courses. This course covers the periodic table, atomic structure, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, intermolecular forces, and kinetics

CHM101L General Chemistry I Lab (1 credit) Fall

This course emphasizes the fundamental laboratory techniques related to atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry, chemical bonding theories, thermochemistry, and states of matter (e.g., gases, liquids, and solids). The laboratory experiments coordinate with and reinforce the lecture materials.

CHM102 General Chemistry II (3 credits) Spring

This course provides a continuation of the study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic and redox equations, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, introduction to nuclear and organic chemistry. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of chemical concepts as needed to pursue further study in chemistry and related professional fields. Prerequisite: CHM101

CHM102L General Chemistry II Lab (1 credit) Spring

This course emphasizes chemical equilibrium, rates of reaction, redox reactions, acid-base reactions, an outline of thermodynamics and electrochemistry. The laboratory experiments coordinate with and reinforce the lecture materials. Prerequisite: CHM101L

CHM211 Organic Chemistry I (3 credits) Fall

This course is an introductory course in organic chemistry with an emphasis on the compounds of carbon, including nomenclature, reactions, and basic theoretical concepts of molecules from a standpoint of electronic structures and

energies. Prerequisite: CHM102

CHM211L Organic Chemistry I Lab (3 credits) Fall

This is the first course in organic laboratory practices. The course will require students to learn basic lab skills

including recrystallization, distillation, chromatography, and liquid-liquid extraction as well as how to set up simple reactions.. Prerequisite: CHM102L

CHM212 Organic Chemistry II (3 credits) Spring

This intermediate organic chemistry course focuses on the methods used to identify the structure of organic molecules, advanced principles of organic stereochemistry, organic reaction mechanisms, and methods used for the synthesis of organic compounds. Additional special topics include illustrating the role of organic chemistry in biology, medicine, and industry.. Prerequisite: CHM211

CHM212L Organic Chemistry II Lab (1 credit) Spring

This intermediate organic chemistry course focuses on the methods used to identify the structure of organic molecules, advanced principles of organic stereochemistry, organic reaction mechanisms, and methods used for the synthesis of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHM211L